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View Full Version : Humanism for the masses?


watsup1000
12-01-2014, 06:10 PM
I have, in the past, subscribed to the magazine of the American Humanist organization and found it quite boring. Most of the articles are esoteric meanderings about various ethical situations. It often reads like a college textbook. I suppose that is okay for determining ethical standards, but it is hardly the type of information that can attract the masses, like religion does.

As long as the American Humanist Association remains primarily a playground for intellectuals, there is not much chance of attracting the "man on the street". Religions have normally distilled their doctrines in such a way that their basic message is a simple one that can easily be understood. I have often wondered if there would ever be a possibility to do the same with Humanist ethical principles.

JJIII
12-02-2014, 06:56 AM
I have, in the past, subscribed to the magazine of the American Humanist organization and found it quite boring. Most of the articles are esoteric meanderings about various ethical situations. It often reads like a college textbook. I suppose that is okay for determining ethical standards, but it is hardly the type of information that can attract the masses, like religion does.

As long as the American Humanist Association remains primarily a playground for intellectuals, there is not much chance of attracting the "man on the street". Religions have normally distilled their doctrines in such a way that their basic message is a simple one that can easily be understood. I have often wondered if there would ever be a possibility to do the same with Humanist ethical principles.

Maybe here?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Golden_Rule

merrylander
12-02-2014, 09:22 AM
I always preferred Rabbi Hillel's version;

"That which is distasteful to you do not do unto others. That is the whole law the rest is mere commentary."

donquixote99
12-02-2014, 11:19 AM
I have, in the past, subscribed to the magazine of the American Humanist organization and found it quite boring. Most of the articles are esoteric meanderings about various ethical situations. It often reads like a college textbook. I suppose that is okay for determining ethical standards, but it is hardly the type of information that can attract the masses, like religion does.

As long as the American Humanist Association remains primarily a playground for intellectuals, there is not much chance of attracting the "man on the street". Religions have normally distilled their doctrines in such a way that their basic message is a simple one that can easily be understood. I have often wondered if there would ever be a possibility to do the same with Humanist ethical principles.

Sure, if there's a way to make a few bucks from it.

I suppose I've just described the Unitarian Mega-Churches....

donquixote99
12-02-2014, 11:21 AM
I always preferred Rabbi Hillel's version;

"That which is distasteful to you do not do unto others. That is the whole law the rest is mere commentary."

A good rule for most folks, but works not-so-well when you get to the Marquis de Sade.....